Higher education

Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Usage: Anticipated

Technologies forecast to be important to teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in the future.

Sample Size:
98-person global panel of experts from higher education.
Sample Description:

98-person global panel of experts from higher education.

Important Developments in Educational Technology for Higher Education

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2019
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
98-person global panel of experts from higher education.
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

Technologies forecast to be important to teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in the future.

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

significant challenges are those that are expected to impede innovation, adoption, or scale.

Sample Size:
98-person global panel of experts from higher education.
Sample Description:

98-person global panel of experts from higher education.

Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption in Higher Education

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2019
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
98-person global panel of experts from higher education.
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

significant challenges are those that are expected to impede innovation, adoption, or scale.

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
98-person global panel of experts from higher education.
Sample Description:

98-person global panel of experts from higher education.

Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption in Higher Education

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2019
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
98-person global panel of experts from higher education.
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Usage: Current and Past

Faculty and students agree that using technology to enhance and engage in learning is most common but differ on social and collaboration use.

Time for Class 2019 asked faculty members about instructional technologies they use frequently in the classroom. The 2018 Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology asked students about the ways they are encouraged to use technology in the classroom. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of faculty report that they use technology in most courses and an even higher percentage of students (85%) agree that they are typically encouraged to use technology by faculty. Faculty are more likely to say that they use technology within the classroom setting – e.g. “technology to engage students in the learning process” and “technology during class to enhance learning with additional materials.” By comparison, students are more likely to report that they are encouraged to use “social learning and collaboration tools” outside of the classroom setting.

[Faculty Question: “Which of the following statements, if any, describe your instructional practice in most courses? Please select all that apply.” Student Question: “Thinking about your college/university experiences within the past 12 months, rate your level of agreement with the following statements: My instructors typically encourage…”]

Sample Size:
1,639 administrators and 2,459 faculty members at 1,624 unique postsecondary institutions. 50,000 students across the United States (data from EDUCAUSE’s ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018).
Sample Description:

1,639 administrators and 2,459 faculty members at 1,624 unique postsecondary institutions. 50,000 students across the United States (data from EDUCAUSE’s ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018).

Ways Technology is Used in the Classroom

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2019
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
1,639 administrators and 2,459 faculty members at 1,624 unique postsecondary institutions. 50,000 students across the United States (data from EDUCAUSE’s ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018).
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

Faculty and students agree that using technology to enhance and engage in learning is most common but differ on social and collaboration use.

Time for Class 2019 asked faculty members about instructional technologies they use frequently in the classroom. The 2018 Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology asked students about the ways they are encouraged to use technology in the classroom. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of faculty report that they use technology in most courses and an even higher percentage of students (85%) agree that they are typically encouraged to use technology by faculty. Faculty are more likely to say that they use technology within the classroom setting – e.g. “technology to engage students in the learning process” and “technology during class to enhance learning with additional materials.” By comparison, students are more likely to report that they are encouraged to use “social learning and collaboration tools” outside of the classroom setting.

[Faculty Question: “Which of the following statements, if any, describe your instructional practice in most courses? Please select all that apply.” Student Question: “Thinking about your college/university experiences within the past 12 months, rate your level of agreement with the following statements: My instructors typically encourage…”]

Page: 
0
Online learning Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

The majority of students prefer hybrid learning experiences that blend face-to-face and online instruction, but show a clear preference for significant face-to-face time.

70% of students prefer completely or mostly face-to-face instruction, while 55% of students prefer hybrid learning environments incorporating both face-to-face and digital instruction. Both face-to-face and hybrid learning create opportunities for digital learning technology; the challenge for institutions is to incorporate technology in ways that are meaningful and additive to the course and classroom experience.

Sample Size:
1,639 administrators and 2,459 faculty members at 1,624 unique postsecondary institutions. 50,000 students across the United States (data from EDUCAUSE’s ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018).
Sample Description:

1,639 administrators and 2,459 faculty members at 1,624 unique postsecondary institutions. 50,000 students across the United States (data from EDUCAUSE’s ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018).

Student Preferences for Learning Environments

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2019
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
1,639 administrators and 2,459 faculty members at 1,624 unique postsecondary institutions. 50,000 students across the United States (data from EDUCAUSE’s ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018).
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

The majority of students prefer hybrid learning experiences that blend face-to-face and online instruction, but show a clear preference for significant face-to-face time.

70% of students prefer completely or mostly face-to-face instruction, while 55% of students prefer hybrid learning environments incorporating both face-to-face and digital instruction. Both face-to-face and hybrid learning create opportunities for digital learning technology; the challenge for institutions is to incorporate technology in ways that are meaningful and additive to the course and classroom experience.

Page: 
0
Online learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Description:

95 American Association of State Colleges and Universities Chief Academic Officers

Percentage of Online Courses

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2019
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Survey question: 

Thinking of the courses that your institution offered over the last 12 months, what is your best estimate of the percentage of courses that were: online, hybrid, face-to-face

Page: 
0
Mobile learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
130 US and international institutions and more than 64,000 students

Student device use and ratings of importance

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2018
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
130 US and international institutions and more than 64,000 students
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Online learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past

Among all students taking distance education courses, just under one-half are taking only distance courses (47.2%, or 3,003,080 out of 6,359,121). Approximately one-half of these exclusively distance students are enrolled at public institutions, with the remaining portion evenly split between non-profit and for-profit institutions. While public institutions host the majority of exclusively distance students, they make up a much smaller portion of the “at least one” distance enrollments found at other institution types. Only 35.3% of all distance students at public institutions are taking exclusively distance courses. This compares to 65.4% at private non-profit institutions and 84.9% at private for-profit institutions.

While the percentage of students at public institutions that are taking only distance courses may be low, the large size of this sector means that there are still more exclusively distance students at public institutions than at other types of schools. Just over one-half (1,546,241 out of 3,003,080, or 50.2%) of exclusively distance students are enrolled at public institutions.

Sample Size:
This report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey.

Percentage of distance students taking exclusively distance courses 2012-2016

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2018
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
This report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey.
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Content: 

Among all students taking distance education courses, just under one-half are taking only distance courses (47.2%, or 3,003,080 out of 6,359,121). Approximately one-half of these exclusively distance students are enrolled at public institutions, with the remaining portion evenly split between non-profit and for-profit institutions. While public institutions host the majority of exclusively distance students, they make up a much smaller portion of the “at least one” distance enrollments found at other institution types. Only 35.3% of all distance students at public institutions are taking exclusively distance courses. This compares to 65.4% at private non-profit institutions and 84.9% at private for-profit institutions.

While the percentage of students at public institutions that are taking only distance courses may be low, the large size of this sector means that there are still more exclusively distance students at public institutions than at other types of schools. Just over one-half (1,546,241 out of 3,003,080, or 50.2%) of exclusively distance students are enrolled at public institutions.

Page: 
0
Online learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past

As of Fall 2016, there were 6,359,121 students taking at least one distance education course, comprising 31.6% of all higher education enrollments. This share represents the total number of students taking all of their courses at a distance, and those who are taking a combination of distance and non-distance courses. The proportion of the higher education student body taking advantage of distance education courses has increased each of the last four years. It stood at 25.9% in 2012, at 27.1% in 2013, 28.3% in 2014, and 29.7% in 2015.

The number of distance students at both the undergraduate and graduate level increased steadily each year from 2012 to 2016. Graduate and undergraduate students taking at least one distance education course increased 5.6% over the previous year, and grew by 17.2% in the four years since 2012. The 5.6% growth rate exceeds that observed between 2012 and 2013 (3.4%), 2013 and 2014 (3.3%), and between 2014 and 2015 (3.9%). The 6,359,121 distance education students in Fall 2016 includes 5,253,997 who studied at the undergraduate level, and 1,105,124 who studied at the graduate level.

Sample Size:
This report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey.

Percentage of students taking distance courses 2012-2016

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2018
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
This report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey.
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Content: 

As of Fall 2016, there were 6,359,121 students taking at least one distance education course, comprising 31.6% of all higher education enrollments. This share represents the total number of students taking all of their courses at a distance, and those who are taking a combination of distance and non-distance courses. The proportion of the higher education student body taking advantage of distance education courses has increased each of the last four years. It stood at 25.9% in 2012, at 27.1% in 2013, 28.3% in 2014, and 29.7% in 2015.

The number of distance students at both the undergraduate and graduate level increased steadily each year from 2012 to 2016. Graduate and undergraduate students taking at least one distance education course increased 5.6% over the previous year, and grew by 17.2% in the four years since 2012. The 5.6% growth rate exceeds that observed between 2012 and 2013 (3.4%), 2013 and 2014 (3.3%), and between 2014 and 2015 (3.9%). The 6,359,121 distance education students in Fall 2016 includes 5,253,997 who studied at the undergraduate level, and 1,105,124 who studied at the graduate level.

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
1005
Sample Description:

1005 college students

Helpfulness of Digital Learning Technology

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
1005
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Survey question: 

How helpful is digital learning technology in the following aspects of your academic life?

Page: 
17
0

Pages

Subscribe to Higher education