Mobile learning

Mobile learning Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample Description:
  • Hanover Research designed and administered a survey on behalf of McGraw-Hill Educa<on with the goal of assessing college students’ digital study habits and experiences. This survey examines students’ college experiences as well as their preferences and opinions regarding use of mobile electronic devices and digital learning technology (DLT) to study.
  • This analysis includes data from 2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents reached in August of 2016. To qualify for the survey, all respondents had to be current students at the graduate, bachelors, or associates level.
  • Analyses compare responses from similar studies administered in 2014 and 2015 when possible. Please note that due to changes in survey design, only significant differences in ques<ons with iden<cal/very similar phrasing are reported. Responses of “not sure” are excluded from all analyses to ensure consistent and meaningful comparison.

How important is it to you to be able to study on a mobile electronic device?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
21
0
Social media, Mobile learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, Online learning Business and industry Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n=302

Top Five Learning Technology Priorities

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=302
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Notes: 

Page: 
17
0
Online learning, Digital Learning Technologies, Mobile learning K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Description:

"In this report we will examine the trends from our analysis of the Speak Up data collected in fall 2015. More than 505,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2015." (p. 2). And there are 2,868 principals participated in Speak Up 2015.

 

School and district administrators' vision of the ultimate school

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
7
0
Mobile learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past

Using Technology: Teachers

[…] the ways in which teachers actually make use of technology in the classroom vary by confidence level. In fact, Bulls are more likely than Bears to make daily use of nearly every tool we asked about on the survey. For instance, 47 percent of Bulls say they use digital curricula on a daily basis compared with only 17 percent of Bears. Similarly, Bulls are nearly three times more likely to report daily use of learning management systems (LMS) than their Bear counterparts.

Bulls and Bears diverge when it comes to devices (rather than tools). Of the six devices we asked about, Bulls are most likely to use laptops on a daily basis (64 percent). By contrast, Bears are most likely to use desktops daily (49 percent). With the exception of e-readers (which neither group uses much), Bulls are more likely than Bears to use every type of device.

This suggests that, for the teachers who took the survey, greater levels of confidence in educational technology are associated with more frequent use of devices and tools.

One exception to this general pattern is wireless access, the tool that Bulls and Bears are most likely to use daily. Here the two groups report using wireless on a daily basis in equal numbers.

Using Technology: Students

We also find evidence that a teacher’s level of confidence in educational technology can spill over onto her students. In fact, the students of the typical Bull spend nearly twice as much class time using digital learning tools.  Half of class time is spent digitally engaged in Bull classrooms, compared with about 25 percent among the students of Bears.

We asked teachers how frequently their students use six different devices: desktops, laptops, whiteboards, tablets, cell phones, and e-readers. Across the board, Bulls’ students use every kind of device more frequently than do the students of Bears.

Sample Size:
About 700 teachers
Sample Description:

Since 1997, Education Week’s annual Technology Counts has tracked the evolution of digital technology and learning in the nation’s schools.  For the 2016 edition of the report, the Education Week Research Center created a brand new way of examining teachers’ views on educational technology. Based on exclusive results from an original national survey of about 700 teachers, the Education Week Tech Confidence Index takes the pulse of America’s educators and gauges their level of confidence in educational technology in K-12 schools, both now and in the future.

Daily Use of Tech Devices by Teachers and Students

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
About 700 teachers
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Content: 

Using Technology: Teachers

[…] the ways in which teachers actually make use of technology in the classroom vary by confidence level. In fact, Bulls are more likely than Bears to make daily use of nearly every tool we asked about on the survey. For instance, 47 percent of Bulls say they use digital curricula on a daily basis compared with only 17 percent of Bears. Similarly, Bulls are nearly three times more likely to report daily use of learning management systems (LMS) than their Bear counterparts.

Bulls and Bears diverge when it comes to devices (rather than tools). Of the six devices we asked about, Bulls are most likely to use laptops on a daily basis (64 percent). By contrast, Bears are most likely to use desktops daily (49 percent). With the exception of e-readers (which neither group uses much), Bulls are more likely than Bears to use every type of device.

This suggests that, for the teachers who took the survey, greater levels of confidence in educational technology are associated with more frequent use of devices and tools.

One exception to this general pattern is wireless access, the tool that Bulls and Bears are most likely to use daily. Here the two groups report using wireless on a daily basis in equal numbers.

Using Technology: Students

We also find evidence that a teacher’s level of confidence in educational technology can spill over onto her students. In fact, the students of the typical Bull spend nearly twice as much class time using digital learning tools.  Half of class time is spent digitally engaged in Bull classrooms, compared with about 25 percent among the students of Bears.

We asked teachers how frequently their students use six different devices: desktops, laptops, whiteboards, tablets, cell phones, and e-readers. Across the board, Bulls’ students use every kind of device more frequently than do the students of Bears.

Page: 
0
Flipped learning, Social media, Internet of things, Mobile learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=296
Sample Description:

296 EDUCAUSE members

Adoption of trends

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=296
Sample description: 
Graphs: 




Survey question: 

■ Most influential: Trends that were already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 61% or more of institutions

■ Taking hold: Already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 41–60% of institutions

■ Worth understanding: Already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 21–40% of institutions

■ Limited impact: Already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 20% or less of institutions

(p. 15)

Page: 
16
0
Digital Learning Technologies, Online learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, Mobile learning, OER, Educational Games / Gamification, AR / VR Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
N=243
Sample Description:

243 EDUCAUSE members

Adoption of different learning technologies

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
             
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
N=243
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Survey question: 

■ Don’t know: I don’t know what this technology is.

■ No deployment: None of this technology is in place, and no work will be under way or resources committed for this technology in 2016.

■ Tracking: Multiple person-days of effort will be assigned but restricted to monitoring and understanding this technology (much more than just reading articles).

■ Planning, piloting, initial deployment: This technology is not yet available to users; however, meaningful planning for deployment is either in development or in place. Staff are investing significant time (multiple person-weeks of effort) and resources in executing the plan to pilot or deploy this technology within a defined time frame.

■ Expanding deployment: In 2016, we will move from initial or partial to broader or even institution-wide deployment.

■ Institution-wide deployment: Full production-quality technical capability is in place, including ongoing maintenance, funding, etc., with deployment potentially supporting institution-wide access.

(p. 47)

Page: 
19
0
Educational Games / Gamification, Mobile learning, Online learning Business and industry Usage: Anticipated
Sample Size:
644
Sample Description:

644 companies

Types of Training Products and Services Intended to Purchase Next Year

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
644
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
30
0
Online learning, Mobile learning, Social media Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
644
Sample Description:

644 companies

Training Delivery Methods by Company Size 2016

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
644
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
36
0
Online learning, Mobile learning, Performance support / improvement, Knowledge management, AR / VR Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
644
Sample Description:

644 companies

Learning Technologies Current Usage

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
         
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
644
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
38
0
Informal learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, Mobile learning Business and industry Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n=292
Sample Description:

The online survey was conducted in the second quarter of 2016, and garnered a total of 439 responses from 35 industries and 22 countries. Respondents were almost evenly split between small, mid-sized and large organizations.

Most Critical Learning Initiatives for Achieving Business Goals

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=292
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
4
0

Pages

Subscribe to Mobile learning