Mobile learning

Mobile learning K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

Survey participants cited a number of advantages for using mobile devices in the classroom, including enhancing student engagement in school and learning (77 percent), extending learning beyond the school day (74 percent), providing access to online textbooks (72 percent) and providing a way for students to review class materials after school (70 percent).

Sample Size:
38,613 teachers and librarians
Sample Description:

38,613 teachers and librarians

How Teachers Leverage Mobile Technology

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Publication Year: 
2016
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38,613 teachers and librarians
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Survey participants cited a number of advantages for using mobile devices in the classroom, including enhancing student engagement in school and learning (77 percent), extending learning beyond the school day (74 percent), providing access to online textbooks (72 percent) and providing a way for students to review class materials after school (70 percent).

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Mobile learning K-12 Usage: Current and Past

Despite widespread acknowledgment of the advantages of mobile computing, students in nearly one-third of classrooms do not have regular access to mobile devices in the classroom — this according to exclusive data released to THE Journal by the national education nonprofit Project Tomorrow.

Sample Size:
38,613 teachers and librarians
Sample Description:

38,613 teachers and librarians

How Teachers Leverage Mobile Technology

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Publication Year: 
2016
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Sample size: 
38,613 teachers and librarians
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Despite widespread acknowledgment of the advantages of mobile computing, students in nearly one-third of classrooms do not have regular access to mobile devices in the classroom — this according to exclusive data released to THE Journal by the national education nonprofit Project Tomorrow.

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Mobile learning Business and industry Usage: Current and Past

[…] 64% find accessing learning from a mobile device essential/very useful. Although two out of four are able to access learning at their desk, many are taking advantage of short breaks and travel time to use their mobile devices to learn what they need.

Sample Size:
2,084 individuals
Sample Description:

In December 2015, 3,563 people took part in a Towards Maturity Learning Landscape™

survey. These were individuals who were taking part in Filtered’s online programmes around the globe. They were largely familiar with online learning and able to select from a range of subjects to meet their needs. The study was set up independently by Towards Maturity to mirror earlier Learner Voice reports about learners in the workplace. 73% of the participants either fully paid or partially paid for their learning with Filtered. Some were indeed employed, but this group of learners were learning independently and in their own time and critically, paying for their own learning outside any workplace. In this report we focus on the responses from these 2,084 individuals.

55% of these learners were from North America/Canada, 27% from the UK

When are people accessing learning?

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Publication Year: 
2016
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2,084 individuals
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[…] 64% find accessing learning from a mobile device essential/very useful. Although two out of four are able to access learning at their desk, many are taking advantage of short breaks and travel time to use their mobile devices to learn what they need.

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Mobile learning Business and industry Usage: Current and Past

Mobile learning, which is the delivery of content using mobile technology such as smartphones, accounted for 2.0 percent of hours available and 2.2 percent of hours used in 2014. Although mobile learning hours only represent a small fraction of all learning hours, mobile learning use grew from 2013, when only 1.5 percent of hours available and 1.2 percent of hours used were delivered by mobile device (Figure 2-6). A third of organizations have mobile learning programs, according to recent research by ATD and i4cp (2015).

Sample Size:
n = 336
Sample Description:

336 Organizations reported 2014 data

Average percentage of formal learning hours available via all delivery methods

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Publication Year: 
2015
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n = 336
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Mobile learning, which is the delivery of content using mobile technology such as smartphones, accounted for 2.0 percent of hours available and 2.2 percent of hours used in 2014. Although mobile learning hours only represent a small fraction of all learning hours, mobile learning use grew from 2013, when only 1.5 percent of hours available and 1.2 percent of hours used were delivered by mobile device (Figure 2-6). A third of organizations have mobile learning programs, according to recent research by ATD and i4cp (2015).

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Mobile learning Business and industry Usage: Current and Past

A third of organizations represented in the survey had mobile learning programs, and most of those (21 percent) were described as informal, meaning the content did not have a specific structure or specific objectives. Only 13 percent of respondents characterized their mobile programs as formal, or structured. Strong correlations to learning effectiveness suggest that the presence of either a formal or informal mobile program might be beneficial for organizations.

While two-thirds of survey participants said their organizations lacked mobile learning programs, they foreshadowed imminent change—21 percent expressed plans to implement a mobile program within the coming year. Another 17 percent anticipated having mobile learning in place, but said it would take longer than a year to accomplish (Figure 1).

Significant growth in mobile learning appears to be on the immediate horizon. However, it is worth noting that nearly one in four survey participants not only affirmed the lack of a mobile program, but professed no plans to add that capability in the future. That point of view may be a function of the variance in organizational learning needs.

Sample Size:
411 learning and business professionals
Sample Description:

The research began with a survey fielded in February 2015 to which 411 learning and business professionals responded. Participants represented organizations worldwide, 55 percent with workforces of 1,000 or more. Companies operated nationally, internationally, and globally, conducting business across a wide range of industries. Researchers took a blended approach, combining survey results with subsequent interviews of learning leaders experienced in applying mobile technologies to support their organizations’ learning programs. Unless otherwise noted, the graphs presented in the Study reflect survey participants’ high/very high extent responses.

A third of organizations have mobile learning programs

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Publication Year: 
2015
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Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
411 learning and business professionals
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

A third of organizations represented in the survey had mobile learning programs, and most of those (21 percent) were described as informal, meaning the content did not have a specific structure or specific objectives. Only 13 percent of respondents characterized their mobile programs as formal, or structured. Strong correlations to learning effectiveness suggest that the presence of either a formal or informal mobile program might be beneficial for organizations.

While two-thirds of survey participants said their organizations lacked mobile learning programs, they foreshadowed imminent change—21 percent expressed plans to implement a mobile program within the coming year. Another 17 percent anticipated having mobile learning in place, but said it would take longer than a year to accomplish (Figure 1).

Significant growth in mobile learning appears to be on the immediate horizon. However, it is worth noting that nearly one in four survey participants not only affirmed the lack of a mobile program, but professed no plans to add that capability in the future. That point of view may be a function of the variance in organizational learning needs.

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Other trends, Mobile learning, Online learning K-12 Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
More than 521,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members
Sample Description:

More than 521,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2014

Digital solutions implemented in schools with positive results

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Publication Year: 
2015
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Sample size: 
More than 521,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members
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Social media, Mobile learning, Educational Games / Gamification Higher education Usage: Anticipated
Sample Size:
50,274 students from 161 institutional sites
Sample Description:

50,274 students from 161 institutional sites responded to the survey

Students' Experiences with Social Media in Higher Education

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Publication Year: 
2015
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Sample size: 
50,274 students from 161 institutional sites
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Mobile learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
50,274 students from 161 institutional sites
Sample Description:

50,274 students from 161 institutional sites responded to the survey

Mobile Devices for Academic Purposes

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Publication Year: 
2015
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Sample size: 
50,274 students from 161 institutional sites
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Digital Learning Technologies, Online learning, Mobile learning, Social media Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
777
Sample Description:

Only U.S.-based corporations and educational institutions with 100 or more employees were included in the analysis. The data represents a cross-section of industries and company sizes:
- Small companies (100-999 employees): 30%
- Midsize companies (1,000-9,999 employees): 41%
- Large companies (10,000 or more employees): 29%
Total respondents: 777

Training hours by different delivery methods

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Publication Year: 
2015
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Sample size: 
777
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Digital Learning Technologies, Mobile learning, AR / VR Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
777
Sample Description:

Only U.S.-based corporations and educational institutions with 100 or more employees were included in the analysis. The data represents a cross-section of industries and company sizes:
- Small companies (100-999 employees): 30%
- Midsize companies (1,000-9,999 employees): 41%
- Large companies (10,000 or more employees): 29%
Total respondents: 777

Learning technologies current usage

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Publication Year: 
2015
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Sample size: 
777
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