MOOCs

MOOCs Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

Our users are interested in MOOCs for both personal and professional reasons. The most common reason our survey respondents gave for taking MOOCs was for personal interest (80% of respondents). The next most common reasons for taking MOOCs were to learn skills for a current job (52% of respondents) and to prepare for a new career (49%).

Sample Description:

Earlier this year, Class Central conducted the first survey of our users. We wanted to find out more about who you are, why you’re interested in MOOCs, and what value you have found in free courses. We didn’t require our respondents to have registered for, paid for, or completed a MOOC. […] We received nearly 2,500 responses to the survey.

 

How Do You Decide Which MOOCs to Take?

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Publication Year: 
2017
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Our users are interested in MOOCs for both personal and professional reasons. The most common reason our survey respondents gave for taking MOOCs was for personal interest (80% of respondents). The next most common reasons for taking MOOCs were to learn skills for a current job (52% of respondents) and to prepare for a new career (49%).

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MOOCs Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

Although most survey respondents expressed both an interest in and a familiarity with MOOCs, many (57%) were unable to identify tangible benefits of free and low-cost university courses. Among those who did find MOOCs beneficial, the most common benefit users reported was improved performance at a current job (257 respondents). Others said that their MOOC coursework had helped them get a new job (194 respondents) or earn a promotion (58 respondents).

More than half of users (51%) reported that they are not very willing to pay for a MOOC certificate, though close to half of users were at least somewhat willing to pay.

Most respondents (85%) thought that employers find at least some value in MOOC certificates, with 28% believing that employers find MOOC certificates highly or very highly valuable.

Sample Description:

Earlier this year, Class Central conducted the first survey of our users. We wanted to find out more about who you are, why you’re interested in MOOCs, and what value you have found in free courses. We didn’t require our respondents to have registered for, paid for, or completed a MOOC. […] We received nearly 2,500 responses to the survey.

 

Benefits and Values of MOOCs

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Publication Year: 
2017
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Content: 

Although most survey respondents expressed both an interest in and a familiarity with MOOCs, many (57%) were unable to identify tangible benefits of free and low-cost university courses. Among those who did find MOOCs beneficial, the most common benefit users reported was improved performance at a current job (257 respondents). Others said that their MOOC coursework had helped them get a new job (194 respondents) or earn a promotion (58 respondents).

More than half of users (51%) reported that they are not very willing to pay for a MOOC certificate, though close to half of users were at least somewhat willing to pay.

Most respondents (85%) thought that employers find at least some value in MOOC certificates, with 28% believing that employers find MOOC certificates highly or very highly valuable.

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Online learning, MOOCs Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia
Sample Description:

The analysis in this report is based on a Pew Research Center survey conducted from Oct. 13 to Nov. 15, 2015, among a national sample of 2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

% of People Who Are Familiar with These Terms

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Publication Year: 
2016
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Sample size: 
2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia
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MOOCs Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

The number of institutions that report that they either have or are planning a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) has remained relatively steady. In 2012 12.0% of institutions fell in this category (2.6% offering a MOOC, and 9.4% with plans to offer them). In 2013, the number increased to 14.3% (5.0% offering a MOOC and 9.3% planning). Results for 2014 saw this drop a bit to 13.6% (8.0% offering a MOOC and 5.6% planning). This year’s results follow this same pattern; 11.3% reporting that they have a MOOC, and an additional 2.3% are planning one, for the same 13.6% total as last year.

While the proportion of institutions that have or are planning MOOCs has remained stable, the remaining higher education institutions seem to be deciding against adding a MOOC. This may be because of their belief that MOOCs are not sustainable. We previously asked all institutions — those with MOOCS and those without — if they thought that MOOCs were a sustainable method for offering online courses. The number of institutions saying that they believed MOOCs to be sustainable fell from 28.3% in 2012 to only 16.3% in 2014.

Only a small portion of higher education institutions are engaged with MOOCs, and adoption levels seem to be plateauing. The total number of institutions reporting a current or planned MOOC remained stable in 2015. While the fraction of institutions engaged in MOOCs may be relatively small, these does not mean that the number of students impacted is also small. With many MOOCs having enrollments in the thousands, or even higher, the number of students touched by a MOOC can easily match that of those taking distance education courses.

Sample Size:
Information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group
Sample Description:

The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States that are open to the public. The data for this report uses information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group. The most current IPEDS database was released in December 2015, but covers results for fall 2014. The Babson Survey Research Group was collected in December 2015 and refers to fall 2015. Data for prior years used for comparisons also includes data collected College Board. The College Board included questions for this report series as part of its extensive data collection effort for its Annual Survey of Colleges.

Role of MOOCs at your institution - 2012 to 2015

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Publication Year: 
2016
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Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

The number of institutions that report that they either have or are planning a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) has remained relatively steady. In 2012 12.0% of institutions fell in this category (2.6% offering a MOOC, and 9.4% with plans to offer them). In 2013, the number increased to 14.3% (5.0% offering a MOOC and 9.3% planning). Results for 2014 saw this drop a bit to 13.6% (8.0% offering a MOOC and 5.6% planning). This year’s results follow this same pattern; 11.3% reporting that they have a MOOC, and an additional 2.3% are planning one, for the same 13.6% total as last year.

While the proportion of institutions that have or are planning MOOCs has remained stable, the remaining higher education institutions seem to be deciding against adding a MOOC. This may be because of their belief that MOOCs are not sustainable. We previously asked all institutions — those with MOOCS and those without — if they thought that MOOCs were a sustainable method for offering online courses. The number of institutions saying that they believed MOOCs to be sustainable fell from 28.3% in 2012 to only 16.3% in 2014.

Only a small portion of higher education institutions are engaged with MOOCs, and adoption levels seem to be plateauing. The total number of institutions reporting a current or planned MOOC remained stable in 2015. While the fraction of institutions engaged in MOOCs may be relatively small, these does not mean that the number of students impacted is also small. With many MOOCs having enrollments in the thousands, or even higher, the number of students touched by a MOOC can easily match that of those taking distance education courses.

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MOOCs Other Other

5 Biggest MOOC Trends

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Publication Year: 
2016
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MOOCs Other Usage: Current and Past

In 2016, 2,600 new courses were announced (up from 1,800 last year), taking the total number of MOOCs to 6,850 from over 700 universities. 

Sample Size:
2,600 courses

Growth of MOOCs

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Publication Year: 
2016
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2,600 courses
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In 2016, 2,600 new courses were announced (up from 1,800 last year), taking the total number of MOOCs to 6,850 from over 700 universities. 

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MOOCs Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n = 525

Does your organization use MOOCs as part of your learning and development program?

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Publication Year: 
2015
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n = 525
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MOOCs Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n~2800
Sample Description:

The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States that are open to the public.

The universe of active, degree-granting higher education institutions that are open to the public contains 4,891 institutions; a total of 2,807 survey responses were included in the analysis, representing 57.4% of the sample universe. Because non-responding institutions are predominately those with the smallest enrollments, the institutions included in the analysis represent 78.7% percent of higher education enrollments. The 2013 responses were merged with the data from the previous survey years (994 responses in 2003, 1,170 in 2004, 1,025 in 2005, 2,251 in 2006, 2,504 in 2007, 2,577 in 2008, 2,590 in 2009, 2,583 in 2010, 2,512 in 2011 2,820 in 2012, and 2,831 in 2013) for examination of changes over time.

Percentage of universities indicating that MOOCS are not a sustainable method for offering courses

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Publication Year: 
2015
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n~2800
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MOOCs Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n ~ 2800
Sample Description:

The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States that are open to the public.

The universe of active, degree-granting higher education institutions that are open to the public contains 4,891 institutions; a total of 2,807 survey responses were included in the analysis, representing 57.4% of the sample universe. Because non-responding institutions are predominately those with the smallest enrollments, the institutions included in the analysis represent 78.7% percent of higher education enrollments. The 2013 responses were merged with the data from the previous survey years (994 responses in 2003, 1,170 in 2004, 1,025 in 2005, 2,251 in 2006, 2,504 in 2007, 2,577 in 2008, 2,590 in 2009, 2,583 in 2010, 2,512 in 2011 2,820 in 2012, and 2,831 in 2013) for examination of changes over time.

Percentage of Universities Not Planning to Offer MOOCS

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Publication Year: 
2015
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n ~ 2800
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MOOCs Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n ~ 2800
Sample Description:

The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States that are open to the public.

The universe of active, degree-granting higher education institutions that are open to the public contains 4,891 institutions; a total of 2,807 survey responses were included in the analysis, representing 57.4% of the sample universe. Because non-responding institutions are predominately those with the smallest enrollments, the institutions included in the analysis represent 78.7% percent of higher education enrollments. The 2013 responses were merged with the data from the previous survey years (994 responses in 2003, 1,170 in 2004, 1,025 in 2005, 2,251 in 2006, 2,504 in 2007, 2,577 in 2008, 2,590 in 2009, 2,583 in 2010, 2,512 in 2011 2,820 in 2012, and 2,831 in 2013) for examination of changes over time.

Percentage of Universities Offering/Planning to Offer MOOCS

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Publication Year: 
2015
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Sample size: 
n ~ 2800
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