Online learning

Online learning Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=310 organizations

Average percentage of formal learning hours used: Instructor-led classroom vs. instructor-led online

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=310 organizations
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
41
0
Online learning, Mobile learning, Other trends Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=310 organizations

Average percentage of formal learning hours available and used via technology-based methods

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=310 organizations
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
36
0
Online learning, Mobile learning, Other trends Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=310 organizations

Average percentage of formal learning hours available via all delivery methods

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=310 organizations
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
35
0
Online learning Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=310 organizations

Average percentage of formal learning hours available via instructor-led classroom

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=310 organizations
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Notes: 

Shows the decline of formal face-to-face instructor-led hours of training. 

Page: 
34
0
Informal learning, Online learning Other Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia
Sample Description:

The analysis in this report is based on a Pew Research Center survey conducted from Oct. 13 to Nov. 15, 2015, among a national sample of 2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

Use of Internet for Learning

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
   
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Social media, Mobile learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, Online learning Business and industry Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n=302

Top Five Learning Technology Priorities

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=302
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Notes: 

Page: 
17
0
Online learning, MOOCs Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia
Sample Description:

The analysis in this report is based on a Pew Research Center survey conducted from Oct. 13 to Nov. 15, 2015, among a national sample of 2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

% of People Who Are Familiar with These Terms

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
   
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2,752 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies, Online learning Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
1,671 from faculty members and 69 from technology administrators
Sample Description:

Gallup sent invitations via email to 22,933 faculty members and 659 academic technology administrators, with regular reminders sent throughout the Sept. 6-19, 2016, field period. Gallup collected 1,671 web surveys from faculty members and 69 from technology administrators, yielding a 7 percent combined response rate.

Most faculty respondents (1,129) report they work full time for their institutions; 293 report they are employed part time. Among the faculty members interviewed, 693 are tenured, 160 are tenure track but not tenured, and 475 are nontenure track. Of the faculty members interviewed, 497 have taught an online course, and 993 have never done so.

Has educational technology led to improved outcomes for students?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
   
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
1,671 from faculty members and 69 from technology administrators
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Page: 
41
0
Online learning Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

Is Online Learning Strategic?

The long-term pattern in the proportion of institutions that agreed with the statement “Online education is critical to the long-term strategy of my institution” has seen small year-to-year increases in the proportion believing that it was critical for their long-term strategy, a steady decline among those who were neutral, and a consistent group of holdouts that disagreed. This pattern was upset in 2013, where the results contained both the largest-ever decrease in the proportion that agreed that online education is critical for their strategy, and the first-ever increase in the rate of those saying that they are neutral on the topic. Results for 2014, however, reflected a return to the historic pattern.

Results for 2015 mirror those for 2013, with the largest-ever drop in the proportion of institutions reporting that online education is critical to their long-term strategy: from 70.8% in 2014, to 63.3% in 2015. The proportion that disagreed with this statement increased from 8.6% in 2014 to 13.7% in 2015.

Sample Size:
Information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group
Sample Description:

The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States that are open to the public. The data for this report uses information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group. The most current IPEDS database was released in December 2015, but covers results for fall 2014. The Babson Survey Research Group was collected in December 2015 and refers to fall 2015. Data for prior years used for comparisons also includes data collected College Board. The College Board included questions for this report series as part of its extensive data collection effort for its Annual Survey of Colleges.

Online education is critical to the long-term strategy of my institution - 2002 to 2015

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

Is Online Learning Strategic?

The long-term pattern in the proportion of institutions that agreed with the statement “Online education is critical to the long-term strategy of my institution” has seen small year-to-year increases in the proportion believing that it was critical for their long-term strategy, a steady decline among those who were neutral, and a consistent group of holdouts that disagreed. This pattern was upset in 2013, where the results contained both the largest-ever decrease in the proportion that agreed that online education is critical for their strategy, and the first-ever increase in the rate of those saying that they are neutral on the topic. Results for 2014, however, reflected a return to the historic pattern.

Results for 2015 mirror those for 2013, with the largest-ever drop in the proportion of institutions reporting that online education is critical to their long-term strategy: from 70.8% in 2014, to 63.3% in 2015. The proportion that disagreed with this statement increased from 8.6% in 2014 to 13.7% in 2015.

Page: 
0
Online learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past

Changes in Distance Enrollments

The 2012 to 2014 growth represents 403,420 additional distance students over this two-year time period. […] The growth in the number of distance education students is all the more impressive given that overall enrollments in higher education have been shrinking during this same time period. Overall enrollments decreased by 248,091 students from 2012 to 2013, and then by a further 173,540 from 2013 to 2014. The combination of shrinking overall enrollments and growing distance enrollments means that the number of student not taking any distance education course has decreased even faster, losing 434,236 students from 2012 to 2013 and 390,815 from 2013 to 2014. This translates into 825,051 fewer students not taking any distance courses in 2014 than two years earlier in 2012.

Sample Size:
Information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group
Sample Description:

The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States that are open to the public. The data for this report uses information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group. The most current IPEDS database was released in December 2015, but covers results for fall 2014. The Babson Survey Research Group was collected in December 2015 and refers to fall 2015. Data for prior years used for comparisons also includes data collected College Board. The College Board included questions for this report series as part of its extensive data collection effort for its Annual Survey of Colleges.

Percentage of students taking online courses

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Information from the National Center for Educational Statistics’ IPEDS database and survey data collected by the Babson Survey Research Group
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

Changes in Distance Enrollments

The 2012 to 2014 growth represents 403,420 additional distance students over this two-year time period. […] The growth in the number of distance education students is all the more impressive given that overall enrollments in higher education have been shrinking during this same time period. Overall enrollments decreased by 248,091 students from 2012 to 2013, and then by a further 173,540 from 2013 to 2014. The combination of shrinking overall enrollments and growing distance enrollments means that the number of student not taking any distance education course has decreased even faster, losing 434,236 students from 2012 to 2013 and 390,815 from 2013 to 2014. This translates into 825,051 fewer students not taking any distance courses in 2014 than two years earlier in 2012.

Page: 
0

Pages

Subscribe to Online learning