OER

Digital Learning Technologies, OER, Educational video, Educational Games / Gamification K-12 Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
9279
Sample Description:

This is a survey of digital learning in K-12 education today that takes into account responses from 9,279 education professionals primarily from the U.S., but also from 65 countries worldwide. Note: 31% of participants in this study indicated they use either Schoology’s Basic (free) or Enterprise (paid) version. 14% of all participants indicated they use Schoology Enterprise.

Use of digital content and instruction by teachers

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Publication Year: 
2019
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Sample size: 
9279
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OER K-12 Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
9279
Sample Description:

This is a survey of digital learning in K-12 education today that takes into account responses from 9,279 education professionals primarily from the U.S., but also from 65 countries worldwide. Note: 31% of participants in this study indicated they use either Schoology’s Basic (free) or Enterprise (paid) version. 14% of all participants indicated they use Schoology Enterprise.

Use of digital educational resources

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Publication Year: 
2019
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Sample size: 
9279
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Mobile learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, OER Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
10,256 EDUCAUSE members
Sample Description:

The survey was distributed to 10,256 EDUCAUSE members as part of the Top 10 IT Issues survey

Technology deployment level (today and by 2022)

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Publication Year: 
2017
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Sample size: 
10,256 EDUCAUSE members
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OER Higher education Other

Faculty were asked how their required printed and digital textbooks were licensed. Faculty overwhelmingly reported that they were using copyrighted printed textbooks (96%), with only small proportions stating that the text was licensed under Creative Commons (1%) or was in the public domain (4%). The numbers for the digital version of the textbook were also highly slanted towards copyrighted material, but at a rate considerably lower (78%) than for print versions. The rate that faculty said that their digital textbooks were either creative Common Commons or public domain were higher than for printed textbooks, but the second largest group (16%) were faculty reporting that they did not know how the digital materials were licensed. This is well in line with earlier results showing faculty do not have a high level of awareness of the various legal permissions that govern the use and sharing of their required textbooks.

[...]

Only a small proportion of faculty report that they are using an open-licensed textbook (defined as either public domain or Creative Commons). However, the 9% rate for 2016-17 represents a substantial increase over the rate for 2015-16 of 5%. Use of open-licensed textbooks may be rare, but it is growing.

Sample Size:
2711 faculty
Sample Description:

A total of 2,711 faculty responded to a sufficient number of questions to be included in the analysis, representing the full range of higher education institutions (two-year, four-year, all Carnegie classifications, and public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and the complete range of faculty (full- and part-time, tenured or not, and all disciplines). More than 73% of the respondents report that they are full-time faculty members. Over 26% teach at least one online course and 28% teach at least one blended course.

Educational resource design process

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Publication Year: 
2017
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Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2711 faculty
Sample description: 
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Content: 

Faculty were asked how their required printed and digital textbooks were licensed. Faculty overwhelmingly reported that they were using copyrighted printed textbooks (96%), with only small proportions stating that the text was licensed under Creative Commons (1%) or was in the public domain (4%). The numbers for the digital version of the textbook were also highly slanted towards copyrighted material, but at a rate considerably lower (78%) than for print versions. The rate that faculty said that their digital textbooks were either creative Common Commons or public domain were higher than for printed textbooks, but the second largest group (16%) were faculty reporting that they did not know how the digital materials were licensed. This is well in line with earlier results showing faculty do not have a high level of awareness of the various legal permissions that govern the use and sharing of their required textbooks.

[...]

Only a small proportion of faculty report that they are using an open-licensed textbook (defined as either public domain or Creative Commons). However, the 9% rate for 2016-17 represents a substantial increase over the rate for 2015-16 of 5%. Use of open-licensed textbooks may be rare, but it is growing.

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OER Higher education Other

Open licensing and the ability to reuse and remix content is central to the concept of open educational resources. It is therefore critical to understand faculty awareness of these concepts. Most faculty continue to report a high degree of awareness of copyright status of their classroom content (84% “Very aware” or “Aware”), with 96% expressing some degree of awareness. Awareness of public domain is also very high, with over 90% of respondents reporting some degree of awareness. The level of awareness of Creative Common licensing, on the other hand, is somewhat lower. Less than one-half of faculty say that they are either "Very aware" (19%) or "Aware" (28%), and only 71% report any level of awareness.

Awareness levels have been increasing for all three legal permissions. The 84% reporting that they were “Very aware” or “Aware” of copyright is a small increase over the 80% rate reported last year, and the 78% rate the year before. Awareness of public domain increased very slightly, with “Very aware” or “Aware” totals growing from 69% this year compared to 67% last year and 68% the year before. Awareness levels of Creative Commons have increased the most, with the number of faculty reporting that they were “Very aware” or “Aware” now at 47%, up from 38% last year and 36% the year before that.

Sample Size:
2711 faculty
Sample Description:

A total of 2,711 faculty responded to a sufficient number of questions to be included in the analysis, representing the full range of higher education institutions (two-year, four-year, all Carnegie classifications, and public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and the complete range of faculty (full- and part-time, tenured or not, and all disciplines). More than 73% of the respondents report that they are full-time faculty members. Over 26% teach at least one online course and 28% teach at least one blended course.

Awareness of licensing of open educational resources

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2711 faculty
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Content: 

Open licensing and the ability to reuse and remix content is central to the concept of open educational resources. It is therefore critical to understand faculty awareness of these concepts. Most faculty continue to report a high degree of awareness of copyright status of their classroom content (84% “Very aware” or “Aware”), with 96% expressing some degree of awareness. Awareness of public domain is also very high, with over 90% of respondents reporting some degree of awareness. The level of awareness of Creative Common licensing, on the other hand, is somewhat lower. Less than one-half of faculty say that they are either "Very aware" (19%) or "Aware" (28%), and only 71% report any level of awareness.

Awareness levels have been increasing for all three legal permissions. The 84% reporting that they were “Very aware” or “Aware” of copyright is a small increase over the 80% rate reported last year, and the 78% rate the year before. Awareness of public domain increased very slightly, with “Very aware” or “Aware” totals growing from 69% this year compared to 67% last year and 68% the year before. Awareness levels of Creative Commons have increased the most, with the number of faculty reporting that they were “Very aware” or “Aware” now at 47%, up from 38% last year and 36% the year before that.

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OER Higher education Other
Sample Size:
2711 faculty
Sample Description:

A total of 2,711 faculty responded to a sufficient number of questions to be included in the analysis, representing the full range of higher education institutions (two-year, four-year, all Carnegie classifications, and public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and the complete range of faculty (full- and part-time, tenured or not, and all disciplines). More than 73% of the respondents report that they are full-time faculty members. Over 26% teach at least one online course and 28% teach at least one blended course.

Importance of factors in selecting required course materials

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Publication Year: 
2017
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Sample size: 
2711 faculty
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OER Higher education Other

Many faculty members have only a vague understanding of the details of what constitutes open educational resources. Some confuse “open” with “free,” and assume all free resources are OER. Others confuse “open resources” with “open source,” and assume OER refers only to open source software. Because of these differing levels of understanding, the phrasing of the awareness question needs to be specific. […]

When faculty members were asked to self-report their level of awareness of open educational resources, a majority (56%) said that they were generally unaware of OER (“I am not aware of OER” or “I have heard of OER, but don't know much about them”). These results were confirmed by faculty comments, and some showed excitement or desire to learn more. Only 10% reported that they were very aware (“I am very aware of OER and know how they can be used in the classroom”), and twice that many (20%) said that they were aware (“I am aware of OER and some of their use cases”). An additional 15% of faculty reported that they were only somewhat aware (“I am somewhat aware of OER but I am not sure how they can be used”).

[...]

The 2016-17 results reinforce the trend of increased awareness of OER observed over the past two surveys. Faculty claiming to be very aware doubled from 5% in 2014-15 to 10% in the most recent year. Those saying that they were “aware” grew from 15% to 20%, and those “somewhat aware” from 14% to 15%. The proportion that reported no awareness dropped from nearly two-thirds (66%) in 2014-15 to just over 50% (56%) this year.

Sample Size:
2711 faculty
Sample Description:

A total of 2,711 faculty responded to a sufficient number of questions to be included in the analysis, representing the full range of higher education institutions (two-year, four-year, all Carnegie classifications, and public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and the complete range of faculty (full- and part-time, tenured or not, and all disciplines). More than 73% of the respondents report that they are full-time faculty members. Over 26% teach at least one online course and 28% teach at least one blended course.

Awareness of open educational resources

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2711 faculty
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Content: 

Many faculty members have only a vague understanding of the details of what constitutes open educational resources. Some confuse “open” with “free,” and assume all free resources are OER. Others confuse “open resources” with “open source,” and assume OER refers only to open source software. Because of these differing levels of understanding, the phrasing of the awareness question needs to be specific. […]

When faculty members were asked to self-report their level of awareness of open educational resources, a majority (56%) said that they were generally unaware of OER (“I am not aware of OER” or “I have heard of OER, but don't know much about them”). These results were confirmed by faculty comments, and some showed excitement or desire to learn more. Only 10% reported that they were very aware (“I am very aware of OER and know how they can be used in the classroom”), and twice that many (20%) said that they were aware (“I am aware of OER and some of their use cases”). An additional 15% of faculty reported that they were only somewhat aware (“I am somewhat aware of OER but I am not sure how they can be used”).

[...]

The 2016-17 results reinforce the trend of increased awareness of OER observed over the past two surveys. Faculty claiming to be very aware doubled from 5% in 2014-15 to 10% in the most recent year. Those saying that they were “aware” grew from 15% to 20%, and those “somewhat aware” from 14% to 15%. The proportion that reported no awareness dropped from nearly two-thirds (66%) in 2014-15 to just over 50% (56%) this year.

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OER Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
2711 faculty
Sample Description:

A total of 2,711 faculty responded to a sufficient number of questions to be included in the analysis, representing the full range of higher education institutions (two-year, four-year, all Carnegie classifications, and public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and the complete range of faculty (full- and part-time, tenured or not, and all disciplines). More than 73% of the respondents report that they are full-time faculty members. Over 26% teach at least one online course and 28% teach at least one blended course.

Barriers to adoption of OER

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Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
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Sample size: 
2711 faculty
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OER Higher education Usage: Anticipated

Faculty members who are not current users of open educational resources were asked if they expected to be using OER in the next three years. Only 6% reported that they were not interested, while an additional 15% had not yet decided and were unable to offer an opinion. A small number of faculty claim that they will use OER in the future (7%), while a larger group (37%) say that they will consider future OER use.

[...]

There has been no change in the proportion of faculty who report that they will use OER in the next three years, remaining at the same 7% this year as it was in 2015-16. There has been an increase in the number who report that they "Will consider" OER, growing from 31% in 2015-16 to 37% this year.

Sample Size:
2711 faculty
Sample Description:

A total of 2,711 faculty responded to a sufficient number of questions to be included in the analysis, representing the full range of higher education institutions (two-year, four-year, all Carnegie classifications, and public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and the complete range of faculty (full- and part-time, tenured or not, and all disciplines). More than 73% of the respondents report that they are full-time faculty members. Over 26% teach at least one online course and 28% teach at least one blended course.

Anticipated use of open educational resources

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2711 faculty
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Content: 

Faculty members who are not current users of open educational resources were asked if they expected to be using OER in the next three years. Only 6% reported that they were not interested, while an additional 15% had not yet decided and were unable to offer an opinion. A small number of faculty claim that they will use OER in the future (7%), while a larger group (37%) say that they will consider future OER use.

[...]

There has been no change in the proportion of faculty who report that they will use OER in the next three years, remaining at the same 7% this year as it was in 2015-16. There has been an increase in the number who report that they "Will consider" OER, growing from 31% in 2015-16 to 37% this year.

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OER K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

Awareness of copyright and the public domain is much higher among districts than is awareness of Creative Commons licensing. Nearly three-quarters of respondents claim some level of awareness of OER, but this drops to only one-third when awareness of licensing is included. Only 40% of districts have any level of awareness of the federal #GoOpen campaign.

Sample Description:

Analysis for this report includes responses from 584 K-12 school districts. These responses represent 48 states and the District of Columbia. The average number of students for the reporting districts was 6,278, with the overall sample accounting for 3,490,735 students.

Awareness of Licensing and Open Educational Resources

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
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Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
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Content: 

Awareness of copyright and the public domain is much higher among districts than is awareness of Creative Commons licensing. Nearly three-quarters of respondents claim some level of awareness of OER, but this drops to only one-third when awareness of licensing is included. Only 40% of districts have any level of awareness of the federal #GoOpen campaign.

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