Social media

Social media K-12 Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
9279
Sample Description:

This is a survey of digital learning in K-12 education today that takes into account responses from 9,279 education professionals primarily from the U.S., but also from 65 countries worldwide. Note: 31% of participants in this study indicated they use either Schoology’s Basic (free) or Enterprise (paid) version. 14% of all participants indicated they use Schoology Enterprise.

Institutional social media policy

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2019
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
9279
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
33
0
Online learning, Social media, Digital Learning Technologies, Educational video K-12 Usage: Current and Past
Sample Description:

More than 514,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2016.

Teachers use of Technology

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Social media, Mobile learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, Online learning Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

“Social learning,” as it is often considered to be, is nothing entirely new. Though many new modalities of social learning have emerged in recent years, in many ways it has been around for a long time. But if social learning has long been present, why has the focus on it increased recently? Some believe the answer is related to the fact technology is now mature enough to address the most common concerns regarding social learning in the workplace, such as tracking, recognition, and security.

Additionally, as more Gen Y (millennial) workers enter the workplace, the needs and demands for a more social learning experience will increase exponentially, as such tools and modalities have been a part of this generation’s DNA. Social learning technologies have a huge impact on several enterprise core processes, from recruiting to training and developing talent. And there’s more: results are quickly measurable because social technologies have a direct and obvious effect on performance. The route from social learning to informal learning is very short.

Sample Size:
302

Top 5 Learning Technology Priorities

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
302
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

“Social learning,” as it is often considered to be, is nothing entirely new. Though many new modalities of social learning have emerged in recent years, in many ways it has been around for a long time. But if social learning has long been present, why has the focus on it increased recently? Some believe the answer is related to the fact technology is now mature enough to address the most common concerns regarding social learning in the workplace, such as tracking, recognition, and security.

Additionally, as more Gen Y (millennial) workers enter the workplace, the needs and demands for a more social learning experience will increase exponentially, as such tools and modalities have been a part of this generation’s DNA. Social learning technologies have a huge impact on several enterprise core processes, from recruiting to training and developing talent. And there’s more: results are quickly measurable because social technologies have a direct and obvious effect on performance. The route from social learning to informal learning is very short.

Page: 
1
Social media K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
  • 47% of K-12 teachers report that participation in social media with their teachers can enhance student’s educational experience
  • However only 23% encourage their students to connect with them on social media
  • About one in three K-12 teachers use social media both personally and professionally
  • 83% of teachers worry about conflicts resulting from social media interaction with students and parents
  • 76% of teachers worry that parents sometimes use social media to monitor their work and/or personal lives
  • 35% of teachers have experienced issues with students and/or parents connecting with them via social media
Sample Size:
1001
Sample Description:

1001 K12 teachers 

Uop_Social Media

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
1001
Sample description: 
Content: 
  • 47% of K-12 teachers report that participation in social media with their teachers can enhance student’s educational experience
  • However only 23% encourage their students to connect with them on social media
  • About one in three K-12 teachers use social media both personally and professionally
  • 83% of teachers worry about conflicts resulting from social media interaction with students and parents
  • 76% of teachers worry that parents sometimes use social media to monitor their work and/or personal lives
  • 35% of teachers have experienced issues with students and/or parents connecting with them via social media
Notes: 

Overview of K12 teachers opinions on Social Media in the classroom/professionally

Page: 
0
LMS, Educational video, Social media, Adaptive technology, Educational Games / Gamification Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
232
Sample Description:

232 Faculty Members across the United States of America 

TWTS_Software Implemented

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
         
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
232
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Survey question: 

What are the types of software that you use or want to use in your classroom? 

Page: 
32
0
Online learning, Digital Learning Technologies, Mobile learning, Microlearning, AR / VR, Social media Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
49 of the world's leading eLearning experts

Top 9 eLearning Trends of 2017 from 49 Experts

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
           
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
49 of the world's leading eLearning experts
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Mobile learning, Microlearning, Educational video, AR / VR, Social media, Educational Games / Gamification, Other trends Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
49

9 Top eLearning Trends of 2017 from 49 Experts

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
             
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
49
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Online learning, Educational video, Mobile learning, Educational Games / Gamification, Social media, Microlearning, AR / VR Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n=150
Sample Description:

To gather our data, we sent a short survey to BLP clients and other learning professionals who subscribe to our various newsletters. The survey was open from 1/18/17 to 2/2/17 and had 150 responses.

What learning trend(s) or new training delivery method(s) are you most excited about for 2017?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
             
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=150
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
8
0
Social media, Mobile learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, Online learning Business and industry Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n=302

Top Five Learning Technology Priorities

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=302
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Notes: 

Page: 
17
0
Flipped learning, Social media, Internet of things, Mobile learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=296
Sample Description:

296 EDUCAUSE members

Adoption of trends

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=296
Sample description: 
Graphs: 




Survey question: 

■ Most influential: Trends that were already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 61% or more of institutions

■ Taking hold: Already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 41–60% of institutions

■ Worth understanding: Already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 21–40% of institutions

■ Limited impact: Already incorporated or exerting a major influence on emerging IT strategy in 20% or less of institutions

(p. 15)

Page: 
16
0

Pages

Subscribe to Social media