Digital Learning Technologies

Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
  • 16% of teachers grade themselves an “A” when it comes to educational technology skills; 40% would grade themselves a “C” or failing 
  • Funding is the most cited (35%) reason for not using technology more in the classroom
  • Concern that technology will distract students is the second most cited reason (23%) for not using technology more in the classroom
Sample Description:

1001 K12 teachers 

Uop_Technology Usage

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Content: 
  • 16% of teachers grade themselves an “A” when it comes to educational technology skills; 40% would grade themselves a “C” or failing 
  • Funding is the most cited (35%) reason for not using technology more in the classroom
  • Concern that technology will distract students is the second most cited reason (23%) for not using technology more in the classroom
Notes: 

Technology adoption/intergration discussion from K12 teachers

Page: 
0
Online learning, Digital Learning Technologies, Mobile learning, Microlearning, AR / VR, Social media Other Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
49 of the world's leading eLearning experts

Top 9 eLearning Trends of 2017 from 49 Experts

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2017
Trends: 
           
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
49 of the world's leading eLearning experts
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies, Online learning, Mobile learning Business and industry Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=310 organizations

Average percentage of formal learning hours used: Instructor-led classroom vs. all technology-based

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=310 organizations
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
42
0
Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Usage: Current and Past

Yet blended learning has lost ground among parents over the last year. In 2015 and again in 2016 we asked: “About what share of instructional time in high school do you think students should spend receiving instruction independently through or on a computer?Overall, the percentage of respondents who said that at least 30% of time should be spent in this way declined from 60% to 55% over the past year. Among parents, the change was from 57% in 2015 to 51% in 2016. Meanwhile, the percentage of teachers favoring a substantial amount of time devoted to computerized learning has remained constant: in 2015, 42%, and in 2016, 41% of teachers think at least 30% of students’ time should be spent receiving instruction on a computer.

Sample Description:

These results are based upon a nationally representative sample of adults (ages 18 and older) and representative oversamples of the following subgroups: parents with school-age children living in their home (1,571) and teachers (609). Total sample size is 4,181. Respondents could elect to complete the survey in English or Spanish. The survey was conducted from May 6 to June 13, 2016, by the polling firm Knowledge Networks (KN), a GfK company.

About what share of instructional time in high school do teachers and parents think students should spend receiving instruction independently through or on a computer?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Content: 

Yet blended learning has lost ground among parents over the last year. In 2015 and again in 2016 we asked: “About what share of instructional time in high school do you think students should spend receiving instruction independently through or on a computer?Overall, the percentage of respondents who said that at least 30% of time should be spent in this way declined from 60% to 55% over the past year. Among parents, the change was from 57% in 2015 to 51% in 2016. Meanwhile, the percentage of teachers favoring a substantial amount of time devoted to computerized learning has remained constant: in 2015, 42%, and in 2016, 41% of teachers think at least 30% of students’ time should be spent receiving instruction on a computer.

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
n=700
Sample Description:

700 classroom teachers

How often have technology been used in classrooms (by purposes)

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=700
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
students = 1,000, educators = 200, administrators = 50
Sample Description:

"In August 2016 a survey was conducted, collecting responses from 1,000 higher education students, 200 educators, and 50 higher education administrators in the United States." (p. 5)

Are digital materials important in resolving system-wide challenges facing higher education today?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
students = 1,000, educators = 200, administrators = 50
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
3
0
Digital Learning Technologies, OER, LMS, Adaptive technology Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample Description:
  • Hanover Research designed and administered a survey on behalf of McGraw-Hill Educa<on with the goal of assessing college students’ digital study habits and experiences. This survey examines students’ college experiences as well as their preferences and opinions regarding use of mobile electronic devices and digital learning technology (DLT) to study.
  • This analysis includes data from 2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents reached in August of 2016. To qualify for the survey, all respondents had to be current students at the graduate, bachelors, or associates level.
  • Analyses compare responses from similar studies administered in 2014 and 2015 when possible. Please note that due to changes in survey design, only significant differences in ques<ons with iden<cal/very similar phrasing are reported. Responses of “not sure” are excluded from all analyses to ensure consistent and meaningful comparison.

Which of the following types of digital learning technology do you use to study?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
       
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
34
0
Digital Learning Technologies, Mobile learning Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample Description:
  • Hanover Research designed and administered a survey on behalf of McGraw-Hill Educa<on with the goal of assessing college students’ digital study habits and experiences. This survey examines students’ college experiences as well as their preferences and opinions regarding use of mobile electronic devices and digital learning technology (DLT) to study.
  • This analysis includes data from 2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents reached in August of 2016. To qualify for the survey, all respondents had to be current students at the graduate, bachelors, or associates level.
  • Analyses compare responses from similar studies administered in 2014 and 2015 when possible. Please note that due to changes in survey design, only significant differences in ques<ons with iden<cal/very similar phrasing are reported. Responses of “not sure” are excluded from all analyses to ensure consistent and meaningful comparison.

Types of Electronic Devices Students Use to Study

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
   
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
35
0
Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample Description:
  • Hanover Research designed and administered a survey on behalf of McGraw-Hill Educa<on with the goal of assessing college students’ digital study habits and experiences. This survey examines students’ college experiences as well as their preferences and opinions regarding use of mobile electronic devices and digital learning technology (DLT) to study.
  • This analysis includes data from 2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents reached in August of 2016. To qualify for the survey, all respondents had to be current students at the graduate, bachelors, or associates level.
  • Analyses compare responses from similar studies administered in 2014 and 2015 when possible. Please note that due to changes in survey design, only significant differences in ques<ons with iden<cal/very similar phrasing are reported. Responses of “not sure” are excluded from all analyses to ensure consistent and meaningful comparison.

Overall, how helpful do you feel technology in general (including both digital learning technology and technological devices like smartphones and laptops) is in each of the following aspects of your academic life?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
23
0
Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Description:

"In this report we will examine the trends from our analysis of the Speak Up data collected in fall 2015. More than 505,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2015." (p. 2). And there are 2,868 principals participated in Speak Up 2015.

 

Elements to better integrate digital content in the K12 classroom

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Notes: 

The specific figure was retrieved from Project Tomorrow's website (https://tomorrow.org/speakup/speak-up-2016-augmented-and-virtual-reality...)

Page: 
0

Pages

Subscribe to Digital Learning Technologies