Digital Learning Technologies

Digital Learning Technologies Business and industry Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n=302

Changes of 10% or more in KPIs after Learning Technology Implementation

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=302
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Notes: 

KPI = Key Performance Index

There is some confusion in the description of the graph: "Keep in mind that the vast majority of companies that did not report any improvement indicated that their KPIs remained the same. For example, only 1% of companies reported that productivity had decreased." (p. 8) -- what does this mean?

Page: 
8
0
Digital Learning Technologies, Online learning Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
1,671 from faculty members and 69 from technology administrators
Sample Description:

Gallup sent invitations via email to 22,933 faculty members and 659 academic technology administrators, with regular reminders sent throughout the Sept. 6-19, 2016, field period. Gallup collected 1,671 web surveys from faculty members and 69 from technology administrators, yielding a 7 percent combined response rate.

Most faculty respondents (1,129) report they work full time for their institutions; 293 report they are employed part time. Among the faculty members interviewed, 693 are tenured, 160 are tenure track but not tenured, and 475 are nontenure track. Of the faculty members interviewed, 497 have taught an online course, and 993 have never done so.

Has educational technology led to improved outcomes for students?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
   
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
1,671 from faculty members and 69 from technology administrators
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Page: 
41
0
Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
n=700
Sample Description:

Since 1997, Education Week’s annual Technology Counts has tracked the evolution of digital technology and learning in the nation’s schools.  For the 2016 edition of the report, the Education Week Research Center created a brand new way of examining teachers’ views on educational technology. Based on exclusive results from an original national survey of about 700 teachers, the Education Week Tech Confidence Index takes the pulse of America’s educators and gauges their level of confidence in educational technology in K-12 schools, both now and in the future.

Ed-Tech Challenges (Bulls vs. Bears)

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
n=700
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Notes: 

“Bulls”: teachers whose tech confidence Index scores are in the top 20 percent of those taking the survey. 
“Bears”: teachers whose tech confidence Index scores are in the lowest 20 percent of those taking the survey.

Page: 
11
0
Online learning, Digital Learning Technologies, Mobile learning K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Description:

"In this report we will examine the trends from our analysis of the Speak Up data collected in fall 2015. More than 505,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2015." (p. 2). And there are 2,868 principals participated in Speak Up 2015.

 

School and district administrators' vision of the ultimate school

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
7
0
Online learning, Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

"Over eight out of ten administrators say using technology within instruction is the best way to become college and career ready. Especially notable for this discussion is that 38 percent of the district leaders specifically identified “taking a fully online or virtual course” as an optimum way to develop college and career readiness skills as well." (p. 7)

Sample Description:

"In this report we will examine the trends from our analysis of the Speak Up data collected in fall 2015. More than 505,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2015." (p. 2). And there are 2,868 principals participated in Speak Up 2015.

 

The effect of using technology in instruction on getting students ready for college and career

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
   
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Content: 

"Over eight out of ten administrators say using technology within instruction is the best way to become college and career ready. Especially notable for this discussion is that 38 percent of the district leaders specifically identified “taking a fully online or virtual course” as an optimum way to develop college and career readiness skills as well." (p. 7)

Page: 
7
0
Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Usage: Current and Past

"Teachers agree; their top wish list for professional development is also about how to use technology to differentiate instruction."

"A key component of that belief system rests on teachers’ ability to analyze student data as a first formative step to personalizing instruction for every student."

Sample Description:

"In this report we will examine the trends from our analysis of the Speak Up data collected in fall 2015. More than 505,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2015." (p. 2). And there are 2,868 principals participated in Speak Up 2015.

 

Teachers' top wish list for professional development

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

"Teachers agree; their top wish list for professional development is also about how to use technology to differentiate instruction."

"A key component of that belief system rests on teachers’ ability to analyze student data as a first formative step to personalizing instruction for every student."

Page: 
7
0
Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges
Sample Size:
~1300 K-12 schools (about 46% of 2,868 principals)
Sample Description:

"In this report we will examine the trends from our analysis of the Speak Up data collected in fall 2015. More than 505,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2015." (p. 2). And there are 2,868 principals participated in Speak Up 2015.

 

What are the benefits of using digital content within instruction?

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
~1300 K-12 schools (about 46% of 2,868 principals)
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Page: 
5
0
Online learning, Educational Games / Gamification, Digital Learning Technologies K-12 Usage: Current and Past

"According to the 2015 Speak Up findings from 2,868 principals nationwide, approximately 46 percent of K-12 schools have already implemented some variation of blended learning and/or competency-based instruction for their students. An additional 15 percent are considering these classroom models as strategic initiatives for the new school year."

"Two-thirds of school principals with successful blended and competency-based initiatives say that the effective use of technology is extremely important to their students’ success."

"These personalized learning pioneers are also in the forefront with the use of student data to personalize instruction (97 percent), online assessments (93 percent), digital content within instruction (92 percent)digital professional development for teachers (70 percent) and game-based learning (60 percent)."

(p. 2)

Sample Size:
2,868 principals
Sample Description:

"In this report we will examine the trends from our analysis of the Speak Up data collected in fall 2015. More than 505,000 K-12 students, parents, educators, and community members participated in Speak Up 2015." (p. 2). And there are 2,868 principals participated in Speak Up 2015.

 

Usage of blended learning and/or competency-based instruction in K-12 schools

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
     
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
2,868 principals
Sample description: 
Content: 

"According to the 2015 Speak Up findings from 2,868 principals nationwide, approximately 46 percent of K-12 schools have already implemented some variation of blended learning and/or competency-based instruction for their students. An additional 15 percent are considering these classroom models as strategic initiatives for the new school year."

"Two-thirds of school principals with successful blended and competency-based initiatives say that the effective use of technology is extremely important to their students’ success."

"These personalized learning pioneers are also in the forefront with the use of student data to personalize instruction (97 percent), online assessments (93 percent), digital content within instruction (92 percent)digital professional development for teachers (70 percent) and game-based learning (60 percent)."

(p. 2)

Notes: 

iNACOL defines competency-based learning as personalized learning that incorporates these five elements:
• Students advance upon demonstrated mastery.
• Competencies include explicit, measurable, transferable learning objectives that empower students.
• Assessment is meaningful and a positive learning experience for students.
• Students receive timely, differentiated support based on their individual learning needs.
• Learning outcomes emphasize competencies that include application and creation of knowledge, along with the development of important skills and dispositions.

(source: http://www.inacol.org/news/what-is-competency-education/)

Increasingly, educators as well as policymakers, parents and community members are acquiring a new understanding of what personalized learning means, and acquiring a new common language around key concepts central to personalized learning. The key concepts include:
• Centering the learning experience around students’ needs and providing differentiated support pathways that include a level of student choice about learning modalities as well as time and pace.
• Empowering teachers to better understand student strengths and weaknesses through the use of learning progressions, formative assessments and real-time data fueled by
digital tools.
• Moving away from the definition of school as a fixed, physical locale where learning only happens from 8am-3pm to a new paradigm that acknowledges the blending of informal and formal environments and the value of student selfdirected learning.
• Redefining education outcomes as the attainment of mastery or competence where the acquisition of knowledge and skills is evaluated through demonstrated authentic evidence such as through project-based learning goals, not just seat time or even once a year test scores.

Page: 
2
0
Digital Learning Technologies Higher education Attitudes/Benefits/Challenges

The Education Week Tech Confidence Index

The Education Week Tech Confidence Index takes the pulse of perspectives on educational technology in K-12 schools. Introduced in the 2016 edition of Education Week’s annual Technology Counts report, the Index uses eight different questions to assess views of the present conditions and future promise in four key areas shaping educational technology: performance, funding, the policymaking environment, and public support.

             The results are based on the views of about 700 classroom teachers who shared their perspectives in an online survey that the Education Week Research Center conducted in April 2016. While the sample is not statistically representative of the nation’s teachers, the results capture the perceptions of a diverse group of educators whose schools vary in grade range, poverty level, and location.

             Responses for each of the eight Index items were scored on a 0-100 scale, with 0 representing the most negative response category and 100 the most positive. The overall score for the Index is calculated by averaging results for all eight questions.

             For 2016, the overall score —a comprehensive indicator of teachers’ confidence in educational technology—is 49 out of 100.

[...] Highly confident “Bulls” are teachers whose Index scores place them in the top 20 percent of those taking the survey. At the other end of the spectrum, the less-confident “Bears” have Index scores in the lowest 20 percent.

Sample Size:
About 700 teachers
Sample Description:

Since 1997, Education Week’s annual Technology Counts has tracked the evolution of digital technology and learning in the nation’s schools.  For the 2016 edition of the report, the Education Week Research Center created a brand new way of examining teachers’ views on educational technology. Based on exclusive results from an original national survey of about 700 teachers, the Education Week Tech Confidence Index takes the pulse of America’s educators and gauges their level of confidence in educational technology in K-12 schools, both now and in the future.

Tech Confidence Index

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
 
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
About 700 teachers
Sample description: 
Graphs: 

Content: 

The Education Week Tech Confidence Index

The Education Week Tech Confidence Index takes the pulse of perspectives on educational technology in K-12 schools. Introduced in the 2016 edition of Education Week’s annual Technology Counts report, the Index uses eight different questions to assess views of the present conditions and future promise in four key areas shaping educational technology: performance, funding, the policymaking environment, and public support.

             The results are based on the views of about 700 classroom teachers who shared their perspectives in an online survey that the Education Week Research Center conducted in April 2016. While the sample is not statistically representative of the nation’s teachers, the results capture the perceptions of a diverse group of educators whose schools vary in grade range, poverty level, and location.

             Responses for each of the eight Index items were scored on a 0-100 scale, with 0 representing the most negative response category and 100 the most positive. The overall score for the Index is calculated by averaging results for all eight questions.

             For 2016, the overall score —a comprehensive indicator of teachers’ confidence in educational technology—is 49 out of 100.

[...] Highly confident “Bulls” are teachers whose Index scores place them in the top 20 percent of those taking the survey. At the other end of the spectrum, the less-confident “Bears” have Index scores in the lowest 20 percent.

Page: 
0
Digital Learning Technologies, Online learning, Learning analytics / Data mining, Mobile learning, OER, Educational Games / Gamification, AR / VR Higher education Usage: Current and Past
Sample Size:
N=243
Sample Description:

243 EDUCAUSE members

Adoption of different learning technologies

Resource: 
 
Publication Year: 
2016
Trends: 
             
Settings: 
 
Category of Information: 
 
Sample size: 
N=243
Sample description: 
Graphs: 


Survey question: 

■ Don’t know: I don’t know what this technology is.

■ No deployment: None of this technology is in place, and no work will be under way or resources committed for this technology in 2016.

■ Tracking: Multiple person-days of effort will be assigned but restricted to monitoring and understanding this technology (much more than just reading articles).

■ Planning, piloting, initial deployment: This technology is not yet available to users; however, meaningful planning for deployment is either in development or in place. Staff are investing significant time (multiple person-weeks of effort) and resources in executing the plan to pilot or deploy this technology within a defined time frame.

■ Expanding deployment: In 2016, we will move from initial or partial to broader or even institution-wide deployment.

■ Institution-wide deployment: Full production-quality technical capability is in place, including ongoing maintenance, funding, etc., with deployment potentially supporting institution-wide access.

(p. 47)

Page: 
19
0

Pages

Subscribe to Digital Learning Technologies